Tag Archives: Prohibition

Texas Senator Father of Eighteenth Amendment

A year and a half after introducing the Eighteenth Amendment, Sen. Morris Sheppard was reelected on November 5, 1918 with 87 percent of the vote.

Although the East Texas native had many other legislative achievements during his 28 years in the U.S. Senate, the ardent prohibitionist would always be remembered as the man who squeezed America dry.  Sheppard died in office of a cerebral hemorrhage on April 9, 1941.

Baptist Paper Puts The Blame On Cities

An editorial in the July 30, 1914 issue of the “Baptist Standard” described the prohibition movement as “a struggle for a higher Anglo-Saxon civilization against the slum civilization of the great cities.”

The author of an article in the same issue contended the big cities were “the nuclei of vice, depravity, misery and crime generated by the liquor traffic.”  No wonder so many Texans got so worked up over the proposed ban on booze!

Baptist Paper Attacks Cities As Source of All Things Wicked

In the July 30, 1914 edition, “The Baptist Standard,” official organ of the Baptist General Convention of Texas, described the prohibitionist movement as “a struggle for a higher Anglo-Saxon civilization against the slum civilization of the great cities.”

Elsewhere in the same issue, another writer really got carried away.  He called big cities “the nuclei of vice, depravity, misery and crime, generated by the liquor traffic, and the places where it executes its most perfect work of temptation, contamination and damnation.”

So when Prohibition became the law of the land six years later, that should have solved the problem, right?  Nope, not even close!